Tag Archives: KSchmidt

I’m Not Cryin’ on Sundays

As a person who studies religion and the internet, I can assure you that it was a very interesting place after the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act last month. In the spring, I finished my introductory religion course with a unit on homosexuality and gay marriage, a unit I was very nervous to go through with my first-year college students. My goal for the unit was to faithfully explain the Church’s position on homosexuality and gay marriage.  I did much work to begin the discussion with the Church’s picture of marriage …

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Dorothy Day: Are We Ready to Call Her A Saint?

I introduced my students to the Catholic Worker movement and Dorothy Day recently. I say “introduced” because despite the majority of my first-year college students having backgrounds in Catholic high schools or at least parish catechesis, only one in all seventy of them had ever heard of the Catholic Worker. Our discussion of Day coincided nicely with a recent piece from Religion and Ethics Weekly on her life and the road to sainthood. While the idea of “St. Dorothy Day” is a welcome one to many of us in the Church, we are left to …

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Sending Our Scapegoats Out To Sea

Laying both hands on its head, he shall confess over it all the iniquities of the Israelites and their trespasses, including all their sins, and so put them on the goat’s head. He shall then have it led into the wilderness by an attendant. The goat will carry off all their iniquities to an isolated region. Leviticus 16:22  Mainstream and social media have been reporting endlessly about the recent cruise-turned-disaster of Carnival’s Triumph ship.  An engine fire left the ship stranded and without power in the Gulf of Mexico. After days of miserable conditions such …

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I Get By With a Little Help From My “Friends”

Of the many popular and not-very-insightful things people say about the Internet, the comparison between “friends” online and those people who actually know our voices or who might show up at our birthday parties is one of the more difficult to contest. Naming all of our Facebook connections “friends,” some have argued, cheapens the designation and confuses the depth of true friendship with the breadth of online relationships, only shadows of their “real” counterparts. I am sympathetic to this argument, but only to a point. I find it more helpful and more interesting to move …

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The Real Good Shepherd

Sociologists of religion talk about a new category of religious people who do not identify with any denomination or tradition, including non-denominational. On surveys about religion, they choose “none,” even though they are professing Christians who attend some kind of church services. Sociologists and other researchers have dubbed this group the “nones.” During my studies as a master’s student, I spent a few weeks researching a local Dayton church community for a class on Protestantism. The community I researched was made up of people who would probably classify themselves as “nones.” As part of my …

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Stephen Colbert and Faithful Citizenship

Among the many things vying to pull our attention away from the Fifty Days of Unbounded Easter Joy, the upcoming presidential election stands out. At least every four years, American Catholics find themselves wedged between a consistent-ethic-of-life hard place and the rock of American politics. Of course, Catholics in both major parties will object that each of their platforms is the clear choice for Catholic voters. But in my experience, especially with young committed Catholics, a real predicament persists for many of us. One of the temptations of our political predicament is cynicism. How often …

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